Some of the things we are thankful for

 

Izabella, the 4-year-old daughter of Petty Officer 3rd Class Kateri Kraft, a crew member at Coast Guard Station Harbor Beach, Mich., and her husband, a U.S. Army veteran, made this project as part of her school homework when asked to show what she is most thankful for. Photo courtesy of the Kraft family

Izabella, the 4-year-old daughter of Petty Officer 3rd Class Kateri Kraft, a crew member at Coast Guard Station Harbor Beach, Mich., and her husband, a U.S. Army veteran, made this project as part of her school homework when asked to show what she is most thankful for.
Photo courtesy of the Kraft family

 

Thanksgiving celebrates the people and relationships that helped the settlers survive their first harsh winters in Plymouth Colony. This year, we want to highlight three things we’re thankful for. These three things help make our harsh Great Lakes winters both bearable and survivable.

Petty Officer 1st Class Justin Abold, training detachment supervisor and lead instructor at the USCG National Ice Rescue School located at Station Saginaw River, Mich., poses for a photo before begining ice training. U.S. Coast Guard photo

Petty Officer 1st Class Justin Abold, training detachment supervisor and lead instructor at the USCG National Ice Rescue School located at Station Saginaw River, in Essexville,  Mich., poses for a photo before begining ice training.
U.S. Coast Guard photo

We’re thankful for our people.

As the seasons shift and ice spreads across the Great Lakes, our Coast Guard men and women prepare themselves and our agency partners to conduct search and rescue in harsh, unforgiving wintry environments. One such Coast Guardsmen is Petty Officer 1st Class Justin Abold, training detachment supervisor and lead instructor at the USCG National Ice Rescue School located at Station Saginaw River, in Essexville, Mich. He and five instructors prepare up to 100 experienced ice rescuers to return to their stations and cutters and share best practices with shipmates and local response partners. Last winter, their work saved 53 lives on the Great Lakes.

We’re thankful for our families.

Our families are our motivations to succeed. They keep us afloat in stormy seas, share warmth in winter cold, and inspire us to strive for a better future. This year, we would like to specifically thank our spouse ombudsmen. The ombudsman plays a critically important role, improving communication between the command and the Coast Guard family members. Coast Guard ombudsmen help families on the move navigate through unfamiliar territory, providing information and referral resources and advocating for family members.

We’re thankful for the Coast Guard Auxiliary.

David Linder, an auxiliarist at Coast Guard Station Sodus Point, N.Y., and honorary chief petty officer, checks on the cookies and shows off his cooking skills during the Coast Guard 9th District's mounted automatic weapons training at Fort Knox, Ky., Nov. 7, 2013. Linder has volunteered his cooking talents for eight of the nine iterations of MAW training. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher M. Yaw

David Linder, an auxiliarist at Coast Guard Station Sodus Point, N.Y., and honorary chief petty officer, checks on the cookies and shows off his cooking skills during the Coast Guard 9th District’s mounted automatic weapons training at Fort Knox, Ky., Nov. 7, 2013.
Linder has volunteered his cooking talents for eight of the nine iterations of MAW training.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Christopher M. Yaw

The Coast Guard Auxiliary provides essential support across most of our mission areas, even keeping us fed. Napoleon Bonaparte is rumored to have said that an army marches on its stomach. David Linder, a former Marine and current Auxiliarist attached to Coast Guard Station Sodus Point, N.Y., knows this well.

Since 2007, Linder has volunteered to cook for the training staff at the Coast Guard 9th District’s mounted automatic weapons training, held at Fort Knox, Ky. Linder apprenticed as a chef for five years, but now does it all with help from his trusty sidekicks; his two propane outdoor grills.

“The time and effort he puts into his meals really shows in the morale of the crew,” said Master Chief Petty Officer Patrick O’Kelly, the training team leader at the MAW.

“There’s a lot of bonding at our dinner tables.”

What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?

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